quoting-shakespeare-to-ducks:

tarrysmith:

lokiwholockfactory:

tarrysmith COMBAT BOOTS

Damn. One of my weaknesses. The Adam combat boots… porn! Right up there with the Caius Martius ones…

I love his loose-limbed, predatory walk.  (::eeeeeeeEEEEeeeee::)

(via sexualthorientation)

tootsienoodles:

pablostanley:

A simple guide to know what the hell you are.


Takeaway: Atheists have beards, and the darker your hair is, the less sure you are about things

tootsienoodles:

pablostanley:

A simple guide to know what the hell you are.

Takeaway: Atheists have beards, and the darker your hair is, the less sure you are about things

(via deaanandsammeh)

viinasu:

Harley Quinn gives me so much life

viinasu:

Harley Quinn gives me so much life

(via the-deducting-demigod)

unceremoniouslykarly:


tin-d0g:

xeansan:

camerongale:

drakensberg:

ttthegingerqueer:

Just filled out my health insurance forms!

yeah!!! fucking around with health insurance forms!!!!

I hate when people complain about “oh health forms are stupid they want my biological sex instead of my gender!!!!” or “they only have male or female!!!”
There’s a reason for that, you dumb fucks, and they’re referring to biological sex
Different health risks are present in different sexes, and whatever gender is in your head does not change the fact that if you were born female, you have a higher risk for certain cancers and osteoporosis, and if you were born male you have a higher risk for heart disease and often a shorter lifespan than a female.
In other words, your biological sex is an important factor in health and health insurance, and your special snowflake status doesn’t change that.

Coulda said it nicer but it’s true; it’s about health.

No. There gets a point where nice doesn’t work. There’s too many stupid ass angsty teens on here that are gonna get themselves seriously hurt or sick because they wanna be a special fucking snowflake. Lemme tell you a thing. Doctors don’t give a flying fuck what you identify as. All they want to know is do you have two X chromosomes or an XY? Because cancer and lupus and certain medicines don’t give a flying fuck what pronouns you use. This is about your fucking LIFE. stop being angsty for TWELVE SECONDS because when you’re in an ambulance or going into cardiac arrest or whatever the situation may be, it’s ESSENTIAL that you get your head out of your ass long enough to tell them your BIOLOGICAL SEX that you were BORN WITH. It literally may save your life.

Firstly, there is some really unnecessary invalidating of identities and name calling in this post that is very uncool.
In my experience, it’s very easy for those of us who study science and medicine to forget that our information is developed within society, and isn’t the end-all, be-all 100% FACT that we often make it out to be. We can’t forget that the process of science is imperfect, as are humans. Medicine and science, like anything else, are created by flawed human beings.
1. Identities and language DO matter when someone is interacting with their doctor.
Many times in medicine, your identity has very little effect on your treatment. If you go to the doctor with allergies, you should have the same medical solution whether you’re a lady, have no nose, don’t speak Czech, or hate the taste of toast. However, some of these things will change the best way for your doctor to interact and communicate with you.
If a lady visits her doctor for allergies and spends the entire visit being called “sir” and “MISTER Fernandez,” not only will this likely bother her, but it may also distract her from hearing important medical information from her doctor or, even worse, make her reluctant to seek out medical treatment again, either from that doctor or any healthcare at all.
If someone who doesn’t have a nose visits a doctor for allergies, prescribing a nasal spray won’t be very helpful for that person. That’s why it’s useful that the doctor not only is aware of that, but accepts the reality of that fact and has alternatives to offer.
A monolingual English speaker won’t reap much benefit from a detailed breakdown of how to treat allergies in Czech, but an interpreter, written English resources, or information from a doctor fluent in English would all be useful to this patient, while a fluent Czech speaker would find these things relatively useless.
There is also something to be said about human decency. I understand if you’re performing CPR on someone that using the right pronouns isn’t your priority in that moment (nor would it be mine), but if I’m putting a bandaid on someone it might behoove me to check in before I start “ma’am” and “sir”-ing them all over the place. Not just in medicine, but in every aspect of human interaction, we as a species need to get better at respecting peoples’ wishes about how they be referred to. If you insisted on calling Bill, your boss, William “since that’s his real name,” even though Bill and all your coworkers asked you to stop, you would be an inconsiderate ass. Same goes for Phillip whose legal name is Kathleen.
2. We need to be more specific when we talk about “sex” (the characteristic, not the act - though that could use some clarification on that in the medical setting as well). The way I understand it, there are four major points that determine how we determine someone’s “sex”:
Anatomy: so, what genital anatomy someone has (this could include a penis, vulva, vagina, testicles, clitoris, uterus etc.)
Chromosomes: sex chromosomes can come in many configurations: X0, XX, XXX, XY, XXY, XYY - sex chromosomes are not routinely tested in the US, so a majority of the population is unaware of their chromosomal makeup
Hormones: this includes both hormones produced during puberty and hormones added in adulthood, which produce secondary sex characteristics including body and facial hair growth, body fat distribution, and voice changes
Legal sex: simply the letter “F” or “M” on someone’d identification documents (birth certificate, government ID, passport, etc.)
3. Often, even doctors aren’t really sure why they need to know your “sex”
I’d like to provide examples from my above categories, as they impact healthcare in distinct ways.
Anatomy. I’m talking specifically about genital anatomy here. Often, this is irrelevant - an eye doctor could care less what’s in your pants when determining the health of your corneas, for example. But in some ways, this does matter. People need access to the medical care relevant to the body parts they actually have. Regardless of their gender, someone who has had a hysterectomy isn’t going to need access to all the same options to prevent unwanted pregnancy as someone of reproductive age with a functioning uterus and ovaries will. Similarly, someone who doesn’t have testicles probably isn’t really at risk for testicular cancer, and someone probably doesn’t need a pap smear unless they have a cervix. In this regard, someone’s pronouns/identity may not be directly relevant to the medical care they are receiving - but they anatomy certainly is.
In this instance, when a healthcare provider is asking “what is your sex?” what they’re really trying to figure out is what anatomy you have.
Hormones. This comes into play mostly when talking about medications and risk factors for certain diseases. Osteoporosis, for example, is much more common in women. But why? Is there something about wearing dresses that causes bone degeneration? Something about being referred to with feminine pronouns that causes lower bone density? Something inherent in having a vagina that makes bones easier to fracture? Of course not. The difference is hormones.
Healthy people almost always have sufficient levels of estrogen production to generally keep their bone density to healthy levels. The difference is that people who undergo menopause experience a dramatic drop in estrogen, which is one of the key components in keeping bones strong and healthy. Since disease and drug research is conducted almost exclusively on cisgender people, it is easy for these factors to run together. But it is peoples’ relative lack of estrogen later in life - not their inherent female-ness or woman-ness, that increases the risk of osteoporosis.
In this instance, when a healthcare provider is asking “what is your sex?” what they’re really trying to figure out is which levels of certain hormones you have in your body. This can help them determine which drugs might be most effective for you, and also give them a heads up for which diseases to look out for.
Legal sex. Unfortunately this is most often used as a proxy for everything else. Many people who work in healthcare (embarrassingly, myself also included) look for that little “M” or “F” on someone’s records and decide whether to call them sir or ma’am, what anatomy they have (and, therefore, which services they will need accordingly), and a general idea of their hormone levels. While it is important to determine someone’s legal sex for insurance purposes, that’s about the most effectiveness I’ve ever seen it have.
With insurance, for example, sometimes someone’s legal sex determines which procedures and health interventions will be covered. An insurance provider may only cover pap smears or breast exams for people listed as “F,” even though not everyone who is legally female has a cervix and breasts, and not everyone who has a cervix and breasts is legally female.
What I’m trying to tell you is this. Healthcare, medicine, and science, are incredibly complicated, flawed, and evolving disciplines. We all want to help improve peoples’ lives as much as we can, and sometimes what we want to give our patients clashes with what our patients want and need from us. It would make many of us better providers to harness our frustration with words and identities we don’t understand to try and provide as best we can for our patients.
Additionally, science itself can be bettered by deconstructing our current understanding about biological sex. Where we have before found risk factors of “women over 65,” if we are forced to understand more specifically what biological and chemical forces are at work, we will get a clearer picture not only of how diseases function, but of how to treat or even prevent them. If what we know about abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs or triple A’s) is that they affect men more, then our solutions are basically limited to “stop being a man,” which is neither likely nor possible for many people. However, if we research further and discover which aspect of what we assume is biological sex (whether it be genetic, hormone related, or linked to social factors), then we’ll know more about AAAs and how to help prevent them.
When our patients react to healthcare provider questions with anger, creativity, or protest, if we respond with genuine inquiry and a desire to improve - both in terms of human interaction and scientifically - we can only make medicine better.

unceremoniouslykarly:

tin-d0g:

xeansan:

camerongale:

drakensberg:

ttthegingerqueer:

Just filled out my health insurance forms!

yeah!!! fucking around with health insurance forms!!!!

I hate when people complain about “oh health forms are stupid they want my biological sex instead of my gender!!!!” or “they only have male or female!!!”

There’s a reason for that, you dumb fucks, and they’re referring to biological sex

Different health risks are present in different sexes, and whatever gender is in your head does not change the fact that if you were born female, you have a higher risk for certain cancers and osteoporosis, and if you were born male you have a higher risk for heart disease and often a shorter lifespan than a female.

In other words, your biological sex is an important factor in health and health insurance, and your special snowflake status doesn’t change that.

Coulda said it nicer but it’s true; it’s about health.

No. There gets a point where nice doesn’t work. There’s too many stupid ass angsty teens on here that are gonna get themselves seriously hurt or sick because they wanna be a special fucking snowflake. Lemme tell you a thing. Doctors don’t give a flying fuck what you identify as. All they want to know is do you have two X chromosomes or an XY? Because cancer and lupus and certain medicines don’t give a flying fuck what pronouns you use. This is about your fucking LIFE. stop being angsty for TWELVE SECONDS because when you’re in an ambulance or going into cardiac arrest or whatever the situation may be, it’s ESSENTIAL that you get your head out of your ass long enough to tell them your BIOLOGICAL SEX that you were BORN WITH. It literally may save your life.

Firstly, there is some really unnecessary invalidating of identities and name calling in this post that is very uncool.

In my experience, it’s very easy for those of us who study science and medicine to forget that our information is developed within society, and isn’t the end-all, be-all 100% FACT that we often make it out to be. We can’t forget that the process of science is imperfect, as are humans. Medicine and science, like anything else, are created by flawed human beings.

1. Identities and language DO matter when someone is interacting with their doctor.

Many times in medicine, your identity has very little effect on your treatment. If you go to the doctor with allergies, you should have the same medical solution whether you’re a lady, have no nose, don’t speak Czech, or hate the taste of toast. However, some of these things will change the best way for your doctor to interact and communicate with you.

If a lady visits her doctor for allergies and spends the entire visit being called “sir” and “MISTER Fernandez,” not only will this likely bother her, but it may also distract her from hearing important medical information from her doctor or, even worse, make her reluctant to seek out medical treatment again, either from that doctor or any healthcare at all.

If someone who doesn’t have a nose visits a doctor for allergies, prescribing a nasal spray won’t be very helpful for that person. That’s why it’s useful that the doctor not only is aware of that, but accepts the reality of that fact and has alternatives to offer.

A monolingual English speaker won’t reap much benefit from a detailed breakdown of how to treat allergies in Czech, but an interpreter, written English resources, or information from a doctor fluent in English would all be useful to this patient, while a fluent Czech speaker would find these things relatively useless.

There is also something to be said about human decency. I understand if you’re performing CPR on someone that using the right pronouns isn’t your priority in that moment (nor would it be mine), but if I’m putting a bandaid on someone it might behoove me to check in before I start “ma’am” and “sir”-ing them all over the place. Not just in medicine, but in every aspect of human interaction, we as a species need to get better at respecting peoples’ wishes about how they be referred to. If you insisted on calling Bill, your boss, William “since that’s his real name,” even though Bill and all your coworkers asked you to stop, you would be an inconsiderate ass. Same goes for Phillip whose legal name is Kathleen.

2. We need to be more specific when we talk about “sex” (the characteristic, not the act - though that could use some clarification on that in the medical setting as well). The way I understand it, there are four major points that determine how we determine someone’s “sex”:

  • Anatomy: so, what genital anatomy someone has (this could include a penis, vulva, vagina, testicles, clitoris, uterus etc.)
  • Chromosomes: sex chromosomes can come in many configurations: X0, XX, XXX, XY, XXY, XYY - sex chromosomes are not routinely tested in the US, so a majority of the population is unaware of their chromosomal makeup
  • Hormones: this includes both hormones produced during puberty and hormones added in adulthood, which produce secondary sex characteristics including body and facial hair growth, body fat distribution, and voice changes
  • Legal sex: simply the letter “F” or “M” on someone’d identification documents (birth certificate, government ID, passport, etc.)

3. Often, even doctors aren’t really sure why they need to know your “sex”

I’d like to provide examples from my above categories, as they impact healthcare in distinct ways.

Anatomy. I’m talking specifically about genital anatomy here. Often, this is irrelevant - an eye doctor could care less what’s in your pants when determining the health of your corneas, for example. But in some ways, this does matter. People need access to the medical care relevant to the body parts they actually have. Regardless of their gender, someone who has had a hysterectomy isn’t going to need access to all the same options to prevent unwanted pregnancy as someone of reproductive age with a functioning uterus and ovaries will. Similarly, someone who doesn’t have testicles probably isn’t really at risk for testicular cancer, and someone probably doesn’t need a pap smear unless they have a cervix. In this regard, someone’s pronouns/identity may not be directly relevant to the medical care they are receiving - but they anatomy certainly is.

In this instance, when a healthcare provider is asking “what is your sex?” what they’re really trying to figure out is what anatomy you have.

Hormones. This comes into play mostly when talking about medications and risk factors for certain diseases. Osteoporosis, for example, is much more common in women. But why? Is there something about wearing dresses that causes bone degeneration? Something about being referred to with feminine pronouns that causes lower bone density? Something inherent in having a vagina that makes bones easier to fracture? Of course not. The difference is hormones.

Healthy people almost always have sufficient levels of estrogen production to generally keep their bone density to healthy levels. The difference is that people who undergo menopause experience a dramatic drop in estrogen, which is one of the key components in keeping bones strong and healthy. Since disease and drug research is conducted almost exclusively on cisgender people, it is easy for these factors to run together. But it is peoples’ relative lack of estrogen later in life - not their inherent female-ness or woman-ness, that increases the risk of osteoporosis.

In this instance, when a healthcare provider is asking “what is your sex?” what they’re really trying to figure out is which levels of certain hormones you have in your body. This can help them determine which drugs might be most effective for you, and also give them a heads up for which diseases to look out for.

Legal sex. Unfortunately this is most often used as a proxy for everything else. Many people who work in healthcare (embarrassingly, myself also included) look for that little “M” or “F” on someone’s records and decide whether to call them sir or ma’am, what anatomy they have (and, therefore, which services they will need accordingly), and a general idea of their hormone levels. While it is important to determine someone’s legal sex for insurance purposes, that’s about the most effectiveness I’ve ever seen it have.

With insurance, for example, sometimes someone’s legal sex determines which procedures and health interventions will be covered. An insurance provider may only cover pap smears or breast exams for people listed as “F,” even though not everyone who is legally female has a cervix and breasts, and not everyone who has a cervix and breasts is legally female.

What I’m trying to tell you is this. Healthcare, medicine, and science, are incredibly complicated, flawed, and evolving disciplines. We all want to help improve peoples’ lives as much as we can, and sometimes what we want to give our patients clashes with what our patients want and need from us. It would make many of us better providers to harness our frustration with words and identities we don’t understand to try and provide as best we can for our patients.

Additionally, science itself can be bettered by deconstructing our current understanding about biological sex. Where we have before found risk factors of “women over 65,” if we are forced to understand more specifically what biological and chemical forces are at work, we will get a clearer picture not only of how diseases function, but of how to treat or even prevent them. If what we know about abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs or triple A’s) is that they affect men more, then our solutions are basically limited to “stop being a man,” which is neither likely nor possible for many people. However, if we research further and discover which aspect of what we assume is biological sex (whether it be genetic, hormone related, or linked to social factors), then we’ll know more about AAAs and how to help prevent them.

When our patients react to healthcare provider questions with anger, creativity, or protest, if we respond with genuine inquiry and a desire to improve - both in terms of human interaction and scientifically - we can only make medicine better.

(via asonderdreamwithinadream)

intrikate88:

shardsofblu:

agentrromanoff:

favorite action sequences
↳ captain america: the winter soldier - nick fury is attacked

Look at this. JUST LOOK AT HOW FUCKING BADASS THIS IS.

But you still truly fear for him, because this shit happens right in the middle of a city in broad daylight, where they’re gonna riddle him with bullets and tear him into pieces. And how most people would then regard him simply as a common criminal rightfully pursued by the police, who deserved the very public execution he’s about to get.

There’s a lot to be said about how they chose the “police” machinery to take down Fury, while Steve and company was pursued by nondescript Hydra thugs and the presumably private STRIKE team. They would have absolutely no problem to murder Fury then and there, but with Steve they know they simply cannot do it when there are witnesses around.

Not here, they say for Steve Rogers. But right here and right now for Nick Fury.

And also? Before the attack, Fury sees the white cops eyeballing him in his nice SUV and says “you wanna see my lease?” This man has decades of experience in intelligence operations. He’s been lead developer on an international security-based predictive analysis program. He’s an operations mastermind. 

AND NICK FURY DOESN’T SEE THIS ATTACK COMING BECAUSE THE WARNING SIGNS LOOK EXACTLY LIKE THE AVERAGE INSTITUTIONAL RACISM HE SEES ON A REGULAR BASIS. 

(via the-tardis-is-superlocked)

all-hail-bill-nye:

totally-stab-caesar:

jennytrout:

jennytrout:

magdalenarivera:


#it is also the ‘i have a live laugh love decoration somewhere in my house’#’i have a child named caedyn’


#Wall decals about bible verses will class up any kitchen #You should come to my Thirty-One party

I can’t stop. There are too many:
#I’m the best mom on this field trip and everyone knows it #Have you read Eat, Pray, Love? #Let’s get lattes after Zumba! #Gluten causes Autism #I will have him pulled out of your class #Oh shoot, I forgot I volunteered to bring brownies to faith group tonight #We don’t let him watch more than one hour of TV a day #Stick figure family window sticker #(whispers behind hand) you’ve got to read 50 Shades of Grey
Forgive me. I am a mother, and I walk among these women every day. I have adopted their ways as a form of camouflage.

dying

ITS BACK AND IT GOT BETTER

all-hail-bill-nye:

totally-stab-caesar:

jennytrout:

jennytrout:

magdalenarivera:

#Wall decals about bible verses will class up any kitchen #You should come to my Thirty-One party

I can’t stop. There are too many:

#I’m the best mom on this field trip and everyone knows it #Have you read Eat, Pray, Love? #Let’s get lattes after Zumba! #Gluten causes Autism #I will have him pulled out of your class #Oh shoot, I forgot I volunteered to bring brownies to faith group tonight #We don’t let him watch more than one hour of TV a day #Stick figure family window sticker #(whispers behind hand) you’ve got to read 50 Shades of Grey

Forgive me. I am a mother, and I walk among these women every day. I have adopted their ways as a form of camouflage.

dying

ITS BACK AND IT GOT BETTER

(via sherlockian-at-23174611)

kiichu:

spcsnaptags:

wolvensnothere:

kurtiswiebe:

This perfectly summarizes why I love the Simpsons and hate Family Guy. 

Yup.

So this.

I watched that episode with my family and I could just feel how uncomfortable everyone was. Honestly, it was a really jarring, unpleasant episode.

Homer is a terrible dad. So is Peter. But Homer’s saving grace has always been that he tries—he’s bad at it and he fucks it up a lot, but he loves his family and he wants to be better than he is.

One of my favorite Homer moments is in “Diatribe of a Mad Housewife.” Tl;dr Marge writes a steamy romance novel starring herself and Ned, and when Homer finds out, he chases down Ned and, rather than attack him, asks him to teach him how to be a better husband.

There’s some part of his stupid self that wants to do better.

I never got that impression with Peter. Instead, the family has gotten more and more abusive towards Meg. It’s really unsettling for me when I started realizing that’s what happens sometimes in abusive families. Abusers sometimes single out one child to abuse, and quite often the other family members take the abuser’s side. After all, it’s easier to side with an abuser than to run the risk of becoming the target yourself.

There’s never really a point where it seems like Peter cares at all that his shitty behavior impacts his family. It actually seems to have gotten worse over the years. He expects everyone to clean up his messes because that’s always what happens; there’s really no reason for him not to be shitty.

And it’s easy to see how Meg is affected. She doesn’t have much of a character, really, because so much her screen time is devoted to being abused. The bits of character development all seem to hinge on her being this sad, neglected person who’s trying her best but never really gets any help from anyone. Quite the opposite; there have been a lot of episodes where her family sabotages any attempts to be herself.

It can be easy to forget how awful this behavior is when the only context is the show itself (frankly, everyone on Family Guy is kind of terrible). Seeing it played against the Simpsons, who are a flawed and dysfunctional but ultimately loving family, was painful to watch.

Look I love Family Guy very much, but even I agree that the Meg abuse is over-the-top and unnecessary. There was an episode where she lashed out against everyone and in turn they became angry at her, resulting in tears and a big mess. Meg was forced to lie and say she had made up the whole thing so they wouldn’t be so upset. 

Brian told her later that the reason the rest of the family picks on her is so they all don’t fall apart, which is awful in itself. He’s always been the one who seems to care more about her than anyone else (and Stewie at times). 

I don’t know where I was going with this but I really do love Family Guy but even I realize that having Meg as a punching bag character pisses me off a lot; she needs and deserves more as a character.

(via the-deducting-demigod)

arminsarmy:

marielovesgroban:

Don’t forget we have to wake up Green Day tomorrow.

Ok just a reminder to everyone: If you’re planning on tweeting billie joe armstrong “wake up” or something tomorrow, DON’T. The song is about his father’s death and so it’s really personal and treating it like a joke isn’t the right thing to do. Plus he’s asked so many times for people to stop and no one listens so yeah. Please don’t do that.

(via the-deducting-demigod)

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